Pelvic Floor

Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Pain

The pelvic floor muscle group which is responsible for a variety of functions including bladder and bowel function, sexual function, and low back/hip stability. The goal of pelvic floor physical therapy is to improve the strength and function of pelvic floor muscles and alleviate pain, weakness or dysfunction in this muscle group.

Pelvic floor therapists obtain advanced training for this specialized niche of rehab. Not every PT will be appropriate to treat these issues. Always check the coursework and qualifications of a PT before beginning pelvic floor rehab.

If you think you might have pelvic floor dysfunction, contact Jackson County Physical Therapy for more info.

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What is a “pelvic floor”?

The pelvic floor is the group of muscles at the base of the pelvic ring. It is a critical component for both males and females for bladder and bowel function, sexual function, and low back/hip stability. These muscles are just like any other in the body in that we have fast acting fibers as well as long-lasting endurance fibers.

For normal daily function, it is essential for the pelvic floor to be strong in both of these regards; it is also critical that they properly relax. As with all muscles in the body, the pelvic floor can be weak, tight, have trigger points, or not be working in coordination with other muscle groups in the body (amongst other impairments).

Pelvic floor therapy is MUCH more than how to do a Kegel!

What are symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction?

It can be difficult to detect issues with pelvic floor function as the pelvic floor tends to operate without us giving intentional, voluntary input. We want it to do its job without us telling it how, and therefore we don’t check in with sensation to it as we would, say, our biceps or quads.

Dysfunction can present as pelvic/perineal pain, tailbone pain, sexual dysfunction, urinary or fecal incontinence, constipation, or persistent hip injuries (such as high hamstring or hip flexor pain) that do not resolve with standard physical therapy or orthopedic intervention.

Pain can often present in odd ways including sensations of sitting on a golf ball, or referred tingling pain into genitalia.

Isn’t pelvic floor physical therapy just for pregnant and post-menopausal women?

Nope! Every person has a pelvis, and people of all gender identifications can require pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT).

PFPT can benefit people with diagnoses from prostate removal to endometriosis. It can be warranted for the 20-something high-level Crossfit athlete to the Medicare patient undergoing hormonal changes. You would go to rehab for a sprained ankle or ACL repair, so why wouldn’t you go to rehab following an invasive pelvic or abdominal surgery?

Pelvic floor therapists obtain advanced training for this specialized niche of rehab. Not every PT will be appropriate to treat these issues. Always check the coursework and qualifications of a PT before beginning pelvic floor rehab. If you think you might have pelvic floor dysfunction, contact Jackson County Physical Therapy for more info!!